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BLOGGING FROM A TO Z

A 1970’s Time Capsule

NEWS AND NOTEWORTHY

Be sure to visit my Pop Culture post today as well.

The A to Z Challenge has dueling decades going on.  Check out the 1980s theme from a fellow blogger HERE

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On February 12, 1973, the release of U.S. POWs begins in Hanoi as part of the Paris peace settlement. The return of U.S. POWs began when North Vietnam released 142 of 591 U.S. prisoners at Hanoi’s Gia Lam Airport.

American POWs at Hanoi's Gia Lam Airport, awaiting flights for home, Feb. 12, 1973.

American POWs at Hanoi’s Gia Lam Airport, awaiting flights for home, Feb. 12, 1973.

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Part of what was called Operation Homecoming, the first 20 POWs arrived to a hero’s welcome at Travis Air Force Base in California on February 14, 1973.

I am sure everyone has seen this famous photograph. Sal Veder | AP file photo This March 17, 1973 photo shows released prisoner of war Lt. Col. Robert L. Stirm being greeted by his family as he returns home from the Vietnam War.

I am sure everyone has seen this famous photograph. Sal Veder | AP file photo This March 17, 1973 photo shows released prisoner of war Lt. Col. Robert L. Stirm being greeted by his family as he returns home from the Vietnam War.

Operation Homecoming was completed on March 29, 1973, when the last of 591 U.S. prisoners were released and returned to the United States.  Of course they all didn’t come home.

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10 responses

  1. GP Cox says:

    NO pictures on the internet could be more meaningful and happier than these!!!!

    Like

  2. artistpath says:

    I remember wearing the metal POW bracelets with the name of a POW when I was in middle school. I cried watching them come off the planes. Tears of joy and sorrow.

    Like

  3. greyzoned/angelsbark says:

    I know this was such a happy occasion but it still made me cry today… for all they went through, for all those who didn’t come home…

    Michele at Angels Bark

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  4. Birgit says:

    This is a famous photo especially of his daughter’s big smile running to hug him. Many of these vets still suffer not only due to their experiences during and after the war but the way they we treated by their own countrymen since this was was so negatively viewed especially by the young.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Debs Carey says:

    A very appropriate and powerful closing line to your post.

    I was a child living in West Africa during the 1970s, so this decade’s history is a bit hit and miss for me. I’m enjoying browsing through your A-Z posts with interest.

    Debs Carey
    http://www.bunnyandthebloke.com
    @debscaringcoach
    http://www.caringcoaching.co.uk

    Like