Just a few days ago Challenger was in our thoughts with the 30th anniversary of that disaster.  Today I recall another space shuttle disaster.  On February 1, 2003, the space shuttle Columbia broke up while entering the atmosphere over Texas, killing all seven crew members on board.
Space Shuttle Columbia Crew

Space Shuttle Columbia Crew

Columbia‘s 28th space mission was originally scheduled to launch on January 11, 2001, but was delayed numerous times for a variety of reasons over nearly two years. Columbia finally launched on January 16, 2003, with a crew of seven. Eighty seconds into the launch, a piece of foam insulation broke off from the shuttle’s propellant tank and hit the edge of the shuttle’s left wing.  This could be seen from cameras but the NASA engineers couldn’t pinpoint the location or the extent of the damage. This was not the first time the foam insulation broke off a shuttle and it had not caused critical damage previously; however some engineers at the space agency believed that the damage to the wing could cause a catastrophic failure. Their concerns were not addressed during Columbia’s mission by NASA management.  They believed that even if major damage had been caused, there was little that could be done to remedy the situation.

This image of the STS-107 shuttle Columbia crew in orbit was recovered from wreckage inside an undeveloped film canister. The shirt colors indicate their mission shifts. From left (bottom row): Kalpana Chawla, mission specialist; Rick Husband, commander; Laurel Clark, mission specialist; and Ilan Ramon, payload specialist. From left (top row) are astronauts David Brown, mission specialist; William McCool, pilot; and Michael Anderson, payload commander. Ramon represents the Israeli Space Agency.
Credit: NASA/JSC

February 1, 2003 Timeline:

8:53 a.m. – Ten minutes after Columbia reentered the earth’s atmosphere, indications of trouble were noted.  As the shuttle was 231,000 feet above the California coastline traveling at 23 times the speed of sound, the heat-resistant tiles covering the left wing’s leading edge had been damaged or were missing, wind and heat entered the wing and blew it apart.

FILE - In this Feb. 1, 2003 file photo, debris from the space shuttle Columbia streaks across the sky over Tyler, Texas. The Columbia broke apart in flames 200,000 feet over Texas on Saturday, killing all seven astronauts just minutes before they were to glide to a landing in Florida. Ten years later, reminders of Columbia are everywhere, including up in the sky. Everything from asteroids, lunar craters and Martian hills, to schools, parks, streets and even an airport (Rick Husband Amarillo International Airport) bear the Columbia astronauts' names. Two years ago, a museum opened in Hemphill, Texas, where much of the Columbia wreckage rained down, dedicated to "remembering Columbia." About 84,000 pounds of that wreckage, representing 40 percent of NASA's oldest space shuttle, are stored at Kennedy and loaned for engineering research. (AP Photo/Scott Lieberman) MANDATORY CREDIT

FILE – In this Feb. 1, 2003 file photo, debris from the space shuttle Columbia streaks across the sky over Tyler, Texas. The Columbia broke apart in flames 200,000 feet over Texas on Saturday, killing all seven astronauts just minutes before they were to glide to a landing in Florida. Ten years later, reminders of Columbia are everywhere, including up in the sky. Everything from asteroids, lunar craters and Martian hills, to schools, parks, streets and even an airport (Rick Husband Amarillo International Airport) bear the Columbia astronauts’ names. Two years ago, a museum opened in Hemphill, Texas, where much of the Columbia wreckage rained down, dedicated to “remembering Columbia.” About 84,000 pounds of that wreckage, representing 40 percent of NASA’s oldest space shuttle, are stored at Kennedy and loaned for engineering research. (AP Photo/Scott Lieberman) MANDATORY CREDIT

8:58 a.m. – Debris began falling to the ground in west Texas near Lubbock at 8:58 a.m.

8:59 a.m. – The last communication from the crew was heard

9 a.m. – The shuttle disintegrated over southeast Texas, near Dallas. Residents in the area heard a loud boom and saw streaks of smoke in the sky.

Source: Frompo.com

Source: Frompo.com

Debris and the remains of the crew were found in more than 2,000 locations across East Texas, Arkansas and Louisiana. Making the tragedy even worse, two pilots aboard a search helicopter were killed in a crash while looking for debris. Strangely, worms that the crew had used in a study that were stored in a canister aboard the Columbia did survive.

C. elegans nematodes, or roundworms, undergo examination by project scientists. The worms are descendants of those that were part of an experiment that flew on the shuttle Columbia's last mission, STS-107, in 2003. The new worms were flown to the International Space Station on the shuttle Endeavour during the STS-134 mission in May 2011. Credit: NASA - See more at: http://www.space.com/19538-columbia-shuttle-disaster-worms-survive.html#sthash.83IMmHVY.dpuf

C. elegans nematodes, or roundworms, undergo examination by project scientists. The worms are descendants of those that were part of an experiment that flew on the shuttle Columbia’s last mission, STS-107, in 2003. The new worms were flown to the International Space Station on the shuttle Endeavour during the STS-134 mission in May 2011.
Credit: NASA
– See more at: http://www.space.com/19538-columbia-shuttle-disaster-worms-survive.html#sthash.83IMmHVY.dpuf

Investigations that follow such events in world history often reveal information that break your heart and make you very angry. In August 2003, an investigation report on the Columbia disaster revealed that it would have been possible either for the Columbia crew to repair the damage to the wing or for the crew to be rescued from the shuttle. The Columbia could have stayed in orbit until February 15 and the already planned launch of the shuttle Atlantis could have been moved up as early as February 10, leaving a short window for repairing the wing or getting the crew off of the Columbia.

Debris from space shuttle Columbia is laid out on the floor of this hangar at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, June 4, 2003. REUTERS/Karl Ronstrom

Debris from space shuttle Columbia is laid out on the floor of this hangar at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, June 4, 2003. REUTERS/Karl Ronstrom

In the aftermath of the Columbia disaster, the space shuttle program was grounded until July 16, 2005, when the space shuttle Discovery was put into orbit. The space shuttle program was ended on July 21, 2011.  I wrote about the ending of the Space Shuttle program in a previous post.

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One response

  1. Thank you for this post. I do not remember hearing anything about this for a very long time now unlike other space events. So tragic.

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