Murderers Row US Aircraft Carriers of Task Force 58THIS WEEK IN WORLD WAR II

BATTLE OF THE BISMARCK SEA

Do you know about the annual blogging event, Blogging from A to Z April Challenge.  I participated for the first time last year and plan on joining in again this year.  This year my theme will be World War II so I hope you visit my blog in April when I bring you World War II from A to Z.  You will be able to access the posts from a page dedicated to the challenge and also revisit my posts from the 2014 challenge.

On March 2, 1943, U.S. and Australian land-based planes begin an offensive against a convoy of Japanese ships in the Bismarck Sea, which is in the western Pacific.

Japanese ship movements (black) and Allied air attacks (red) during the battle

Japanese ship movements (black) and Allied air attacks (red) during the battle

On March 1, U.S. reconnaissance planes spotted 16 Japanese ships en route to Lae and Salamaua in New Guinea. The Japanese were attempting to keep from losing the island and their garrisons there by sending 7,000 reinforcements and aircraft fuel and supplies.

"BismarckSeaShip" by Unknown - This image is available from the Collection Database of the Australian War Memorial under the ID Number: 128159This tag does not indicate the copyright status of the attached work. A normal copyright tag is still required. See Commons:Licensing for more information.Български | English | Français | हिन्दी | Македонски | Português | +/−. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:BismarckSeaShip.jpg#mediaviewer/File:BismarckSeaShip.jpg

“BismarckSeaShip” by Unknown – This image is available from the Collection Database of the Australian War Memorial under the ID Number: 128159This tag does not indicate the copyright status of the attached work. A normal copyright tag is still required. See Commons:Licensing for more information.Български | English | Français | हिन्दी | Македонски | Português | +/−. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons – http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:BismarckSeaShip.jpg#mediaviewer/File:BismarckSeaShip.jpg

But a U.S. bombing campaign, beginning March 2 and lasting until the March 4, consisting of 137 American bombers supported by U.S. and Australian fighters, destroyed eight Japanese troop transports and four Japanese destroyers. More than 3,000 Japanese troops and sailors drowned as a consequence, and the supplies sunk with their ships. Of 150 Japanese fighter planes that attempted to engage the American bombers, 102 were shot down. It was an utter disaster for the Japanese–the U.S. 5th Air Force and the Royal Australian Air Force dropped a total of 213 tons of bombs on the Japanese convoy.

British Prime Minister Winston Churchill chose March 4, the official end of the battle, to congratulate President Franklin D. Roosevelt, since that day was also the 10th anniversary of the president’s first inauguration.

“Accept my warmest congratulations on your brilliant victory in the Pacific, which fitly salutes the end of your first 10 years.”

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One response

  1. Birgit says:

    That was quite a vicious battle and many lives were lost. Again War is war and, in peacetime, it is hard to fathom but a World War leads to many battles with huge casualties

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