Hitler1aTHIS WEEK IN WORLD WAR II

HITLER’S PUPPET, VIDKUN QUISLING

Do you know about the annual blogging event, Blogging from A to Z April Challenge.  I participated for the first time last year and plan on joining in again this year.  This year my theme will be World War II so I hope you visit my blog in April when I bring you World War II from A to Z.  You will be able to access the posts from a page dedicated to the challenge and also revisit my posts from the 2014 challenge.

On February 2, 1942, Vidkun Quisling, a collaborator with the German occupiers of Norway, is established as prime minister of a puppet government.

On April 9, 1940, German warships entered major Norwegian ports, from Narvik to Oslo, deployed thousands of German troops, and occupied Norway. German forces were able to slip through the mines Britain had laid around Norwegian ports because local garrisons were ordered to allow the Germans to land unopposed. The order came from a Norwegian commander, Vidkun Quisling, who was loyal to Norway’s pro-fascist former foreign minister.

Hours after the invasion, the German minister in Oslo demanded Norway’s surrender. The Norwegian government refused, and the Germans responded with a parachute invasion. In September 1940, “commissarial counselors” in the control of the Germans replaced Norway’s administrative council. Chief of these “counselors” was Quisling, who was given dictatorial powers and who proceeded to earn the enmity of Norwegians as he sent thousands of people to German concentration camps and executed members of the resistance movement.

On the right Adolf Hitler meets his puppet Vidkun Quisling In office 1 February 1942 – 9 May 1945 as Norways Minister President of Norway.

On the right Adolf Hitler meets his puppet Vidkun Quisling In office 1 February 1942 – 9 May 1945 as Norways Minister President of Norway.

On February 1, 1942, the commissarial counselors formed a formal government loyal to Germany, with Quisling as its prime minister. When Germany finally surrendered in May 1945, Quisling was arrested by Norway’s Allied liberators, tried for treason, and executed. His name continues to be a synonym for “traitor.”

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7 responses

  1. Arlee Bird says:

    WWII should be an interesting A to Z topic. So many facets to explore!

    Arlee Bird
    A to Z Challenge Co-host
    Tossing It Out

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  2. a gray says:

    As a very young person, I heard talk of in which the word “quisling” was used. For a long time, I thought it was something very odious. It was only later that I learned it was a surname of a traitor.

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  3. Birgit says:

    Wow…I am sad to say I didn’t know about him but glad he got his just desserts

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