On September 10, 1776, General George Washington asks for a volunteer for an extremely dangerous mission: to gather intelligence behind enemy lines before the coming Battle of Harlem Heights. Captain Nathan Hale of the 19th Regiment of the Continental Army stepped forward and subsequently become one of the first known American spies of the Revolutionary War.

American Revolution: Key Military Figures — Nathan Hale Spying on British

American Revolution: Key Military Figures — Nathan Hale Spying on British

Disguised as a Dutch schoolmaster, the Yale University-educated Hale slipped behind British lines on Long Island and then successfully gathered information about British troop movements for the next several weeks. While Hale was behind enemy lines, the British invaded the island of Manhattan; they took control of the city on September 15, 1776. When the city was set on fire on September 20, 1776, British soldiers were put on high alert for sympathizers to the Patriot cause. The following evening, on September 21, 1776, Hale was captured while sailing Long Island Sound, trying to cross back into American-controlled territory.

22nd September 1776: British soldiers preparing to hang the American patriot and spy, Nathan Hale (1755 - 1776).

22nd September 1776: British soldiers preparing to hang the American patriot and spy, Nathan Hale (1755 – 1776).

Hale was interrogated by British General William Howe and, when it was discovered that he was carrying incriminating documents, General Howe ordered his execution for spying, which was set for the following morning. After being led to the gallows, legend holds that Hale was asked if he had any last words and that he replied with these now-famous words,

“I only regret that I have but one life to give for my country.”

There is no historical record to prove that Hale actually made this statement, but, if he did, he may have been inspired by these lines in English author Joseph Addison’s 1713 play Cato: “What a pity it is/That we can die but once to serve our country.”

Patriot spy Nathan Hale was hanged by the British on the morning of September 22, 1776. He was just 21 years old. Although rumors later surfaced that Hale’s capture was the result of a betrayal by his first cousin and British Loyalist Samuel Hale, the exact circumstances leading to Hale’s arrest have never been discovered.

Nathan Hale, by Frederick MacMonnies, City Hall Park, New York

Nathan Hale, by Frederick MacMonnies, City Hall Park, New York

Advertisements

One response

  1. Birgit says:

    only 21…wow. It seems that back then and even 50 years ago 21 seemed more mature and manly whereas today most 21 yr old men still look like they would suckle on a nookie. I didn’t know about this man and that he was the first spy-very patriotic

    Like