world-war-2They say variety is the spice of life.  If you look forward to my daily posts about a variety of historical events, don’t worry.  I am not straying too far.  Today I start a new segment on my blog where every Thursday my posts will be about events occurring during World War II.  I call it This Week in World War II.  Each Thursday I will post about one or more historical events that occurred in the war years 1938 to 1945.  I use 1938 because even though the war in Europe began in 1939, there was a lot going on with Japan long before.

On my blog last September, I wrote about Germany invading Poland, but I felt it was an appropriate story for the start of this new segment.

 

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On September 1, 1939, German forces bombard Poland on land and from the air, as Adolf Hitler seeks to regain lost territory and ultimately rule Poland. World War II had begun.

German motor column is crossing the Polish border.

German motor column is crossing the Polish border.

The German invasion of Poland was a primer on how Hitler intended to wage war–what would become the “blitzkrieg” strategy. This was characterized by extensive bombing early on to destroy the enemy’s air capacity, railroads, communication lines, and munitions dumps, followed by a massive land invasion with overwhelming numbers of troops, tanks, and artillery. Once the German forces had plowed their way through, devastating a swath of territory, infantry moved in, picking off any remaining resistance.

German motor column is crossing the Polish border.

Once Hitler had a base of operations within the target country, he immediately began setting up “security” forces to annihilate all enemies of his Nazi ideology, whether racial, religious, or political. Concentration camps for slave laborers and the extermination of civilians went hand in hand with German rule of a conquered nation. For example, within one day of the German invasion of Poland, Hitler was already setting up SS “Death’s Head” regiments to terrorize the populace.

Triumphant Nazis parade in Warsaw

Triumphant Nazis parade in Warsaw

The Polish army made several severe strategic miscalculations early on. Although 1 million strong, the Polish forces were severely under-equipped and attempted to take the Germans head-on with horsed cavaliers in a forward concentration, rather than falling back to more natural defensive positions.

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The outmoded thinking of the Polish commanders coupled with the antiquated state of its military was simply no match for the overwhelming and modern mechanized German forces. And, of course, any hope the Poles might have had of a Soviet counter-response was dashed with the signing of the Ribbentrop-Molotov Nonaggression Pact.

Nazi foreign minister Joachim von Ribbentrop (left), Soviet leader Joseph Stalin (center), and Soviet foreign minister Viacheslav Molotov (right) at the signing of the nonaggression pact between Germany and the Soviet Union. Moscow, Soviet Union, August 1939. — Wide World Photo

Nazi foreign minister Joachim von Ribbentrop (left), Soviet leader Joseph Stalin (center), and Soviet foreign minister Viacheslav Molotov (right) at the signing of the nonaggression pact between Germany and the Soviet Union. Moscow, Soviet Union, August 1939.
— Wide World Photo

Great Britain would respond with bombing raids over Germany three days later.

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One response

  1. Birgit says:

    The horrible war began and the overall loss of life and heartache to follow still ripples today quite strongly. You know that last picture of Ribbentrop looks like Anthony Hopkins from Silence of the Lambs…made me jump for a second. Stalin, the blood thirsty SOB..more needs to be known of his horrific deeds

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