Two events occurred on May 7th thirty years apart.  The first was early in World War I and one of the major events that catapulted the United States into the war.  The second was one day prior to the end of World War II.

On the afternoon of May 7, 1915, the British ocean liner Lusitania is torpedoed without warning by a German submarine off the south coast of Ireland. Within 20 minutes, the vessel sank into the Celtic Sea. Of 1,959 passengers and crew, 1,198 people were drowned, including 128 Americans.

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The attack aroused considerable indignation in the United States, but Germany defended the action, noting that it had issued warnings of its intent to attack all ships, neutral or otherwise, that entered the war zone around Britain.

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World War I had been raging since 1914.  President Woodrow Wilson , in line with the feelings of most Americans pledged neutrality for the United States.

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America’s closest trading partner, Britain was at war with Germany and the United States was not in agreement with Germany’s attempted quarantine of the British isles.   Several U.S. ships traveling to Britain were damaged or sunk by German mines, and in February 1915 Germany announced unrestricted submarine warfare in the waters around Britain.

In early May 1915, several New York newspapers published a warning by the German embassy in Washington that Americans traveling on British or Allied ships in war zones did so at their own risk.  The announcement was placed on the same page as an advertisement of the imminent sailing of the Lusitania liner from New York back to Liverpool.

 

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The sinkings of merchant ships off the south coast of Ireland prompted the British Admiralty to warn the Lusitania to avoid the area or take simple evasive action, such as zigzagging to confuse U-boats plotting the vessel’s course. The captain of the Lusitania ignored these recommendations, and at 2:12 p.m. on May 7 the 32,000-ton ship was hit by an exploding torpedo on its starboard side. The torpedo blast was followed by a larger explosion, probably of the ship’s boilers, and the ship sunk in 20 minutes.

It was revealed that the Lusitania was carrying about 173 tons of war munitions for Britain, which the Germans cited as further justification for the attack. The United States eventually sent three notes to Berlin protesting the action, and Germany apologized and pledged to end unrestricted submarine warfare. In November, however, a U-boat sunk an Italian liner without warning, killing 272 people, including 27 Americans. Public opinion in the United States began to turn irrevocably against Germany.

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On January 31, 1917, Germany, determined to win its war of attrition against the Allies, announced that it would resume unrestricted warfare in war-zone waters. Three days later, the United States broke diplomatic relations with Germany, and just hours after that the American liner Housatonic was sunk by a German U-boat. On February 22, Congress passed a $250 million arms appropriations bill intended to make the United States ready for war. In late March, Germany sunk four more U.S. merchant ships, and on April 2 President Wilson appeared before Congress and called for a declaration of war against Germany. On April 4, the Senate voted to declare war against Germany, and two days later the House of Representatives endorsed the declaration. With that, America entered World War I.

 

Thirty years later on May 7, 1945, the German High Command, in the person of General Alfred Jodl, signs the unconditional surrender of all German forces, East and West, at Reims, in northwestern France.  By this date, Adolf Hitler has already committed suicide (April 30, 1945).

Alfred Jodl (between Major Wilhelm Oxenius to the left and Generaladmiral Hans-Georg von Friedeburg to the right) signing the German Instrument of Surrender at Reims, France 7 May 1945

Alfred Jodl (between Major Wilhelm Oxenius to the left and Generaladmiral Hans-Georg von Friedeburg to the right) signing the German Instrument of Surrender at Reims, France 7 May 1945

At first, General Jodl hoped to limit the terms of German surrender to only those forces still fighting the Western Allies. But General Dwight Eisenhower demanded complete surrender of all German forces, those fighting in the East as well as in the West.

General Dwight D. Eisenhower announced to the World, Germany accepted unconditional surrender.

General Dwight D. Eisenhower announced to the World, Germany accepted unconditional surrender.

If this demand was not met, Eisenhower was prepared to seal off the Western front, preventing Germans from fleeing to the West in order to surrender, thereby leaving them in the hands of the enveloping Soviet forces. Jodl radioed Grand Admiral Karl Donitz, Hitler’s successor, with the terms.

Grand Admiral Karl Donitz

Grand Admiral Karl Donitz

Donitz ordered him to sign. So with Russian General Ivan Susloparov and French General Francois Sevez signing as witnesses, and General Walter Bedell Smith, Ike’s chief of staff, signing for the Allied Expeditionary Force, Germany was-at least on paper-defeated. Fighting would still go on in the East for almost another day. But the war in the West was over.

“For Red high command, Major General Ivan Susloparov signs, to be followed by French General Francois Sevez for [Alphonse] Juin, commander of French expeditionary forces. At right, [American Gen. Carl Andrew] Spaatz.”

“For Red high command, Major General Ivan Susloparov signs, to be followed by French General Francois Sevez for [Alphonse] Juin, commander of French expeditionary forces. At right, [American Gen. Carl Andrew] Spaatz.”

Since General Susloparov did not have explicit permission from Soviet Premier Stalin to sign the surrender papers, even as a witness, he was quickly hustled back East-into the hands of the Soviet secret police, never to be heard from again. Alfred Jodl, who was wounded in the assassination attempt on Hitler on July 20, 1944, would be found guilty of war crimes (which included the shooting of hostages) at Nuremberg and hanged on October 16, 1946-then granted a pardon, posthumously, in 1953, after a German appeals court found Jodl not guilty of breaking international law.This story continues tomorrow on my blog as May 8, 1945 is VE Day -Victory in Europe.
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2 responses

  1. Birgit says:

    I always heard about the Lusitania but never knew that the Capt. disregarded to take those measures to just zig-zag. This was very informative especially the signing of the peace treaty and that one Russian disappeared. very sad

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    • One of the worst disasters in US Naval history, the USS Indianapolis had several matters that made it such a disaster but failing the zig zag was one of them.

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