LIf you were raised on American History, you probably know a lot about the Liberty Bell.  After all, the Liberty Bell is one of the symbols of our nation.  As school children we know this bell but we aren’t normally involved in an indepth study of the bell.  Much of the information that I am about to write is from the following website http://www.ushistory.org/libertybell/index.html

This is the writing on the Liberty Bell

This is the writing on the Liberty Bell

  • The Liberty Bell is currently housed at the Liberty Bell Center, 6th and Market Streets Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA
The Liberty Bell in the Liberty Bell Center, Philadelphia, PA

The Liberty Bell in the Liberty Bell Center, Philadelphia, PA

  • The bell was originally cast at the Whitechapel Bell Foundry, London England in 1752.  The bell was recast in 1753 by Pass & Stow Philadelphia and again later that same year.
The Whitechapel Bell Foundry still operates today.

The Whitechapel Bell Foundry still operates today.

  • The Bell was sent from England on the ship Hibernia, captained by William Child.
  • The Liberty Bell is no longer rung due to the famous crack but the Normandy Bell is a exact duplicate.  The note is E Flat.  At this link you can hear the bell ring but I warn you, don’t have your speakers turned up too loud.  There is a start and stop icon. http://www.ushistory.org/libertybell/images/normandybellsound.swf
  • The Liberty Bell cracked the first time she was rung.  The “crack” is approximately 1/2 inch wide and 24.5 inches long. The Bell actually suffered a series of hairline cracks. The area around the crack was expanded in hopes of extending the useful life of the Bell. In the picture at right, note the hairline crack that finally rendered the bell unusable extending upward.
The Liberty Bell and her crack

The Liberty Bell and her crack

  • On June 6, 1944, when Allied forces landed in France, the sound of the bell was broadcast to all parts of the country
  • There are three known recordings of the Bell. Two were made in the 1940s for radio stations to play; the third is currently owned by Columbia Records.
  • On the bell, “Pennsylvania” is spelled “Pensylvania”

Famous Quotes about the Liberty Bell

Not far from here where we gather today is a symbol of freedom familiar to all Americans — the Liberty Bell. When the Declaration of Independence was first read in public, the Liberty Bell was sounded in celebration, and a witness said: “It rang as if it meant something.”

– George W. Bush, December 12, 2005. The reference is to The Old Bell of Independence, a work of fiction.

Yes there’s a lady that stands in a harbor for what we believe. And there’s a bell that still echoes the price that it cost to be free.

– Aaron Tippen, “Where The Stars And Stripes And Eagles Fly”

I ask you…to adopt the principles proclaimed by yourselves, by your revolutionary fathers, and by the old bell in Independence Hall….

– Frederick Douglass, at the Southern Loyalists’ Convention. Philadelphia, 1866

The Liberty Bell is “a very significant symbol for the entire democratic world.”

– Nelson Mandela, Philadelphia Inquirer, July 4, 1993.

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4 responses

  1. Birgit says:

    The bell is quite the symbol and love the quotes especially from Frederick Douglas.

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  2. Love the quotes and info. Thanks for the link since I don’t know when or if I’ll hear it in person! 🙂

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