Submitted for the Online Dictionary Weekly Word Challenge: Blowzy

The Late Great Lucille Ball in Stone Pillow

The Late Great Lucille Ball in Stone Pillow

Invisible Citizen

People pass by not seeing.

She has a life story but no one to tell.

Her blowzy appearance, people shun.

Does anyone remember her?

Does anyone care?

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This is how it works.  It’s Thursday so it is time for another Online Dictionary Word of the Day writing challenge. Every day an online dictionary app notifies me of the “Word of the Day”. In this weekly event, I will use the word issued on Thursday and challenge my fellow bloggers to answer the call.

  • There are no restrictions on the type of submission. It can be fiction, non-fiction, poetry, prose or art/photography.
  • If your submission is a writing, it must use the Word of the Day requested under any of the definitions; however no variations on the form of the word.
  • If you submit artwork or photography it must communicate at least one of the definitions as presented in the assignment.
  • If it is not your artwork or other submission, please give credit where credit is due.
  • Use the tag ODWord to help others find your post.
  • Include a link to this post in your submission to create a pingback. Links in comments are also welcome.
  • Be sure to comment on the submission of your fellow bloggers. I am sure everyone wants feedback.
  • The event generally runs Thursday through Wednesday; however it is really never closed. You can access previous challenges on the left panel of the blog.
  • My submission today can be found below the issued word.

For this week’s challenge, please give me BLOWZY

Blowzy

\ BLOU-zee \  , adjective;
1.  having a coarse, ruddy complexion.
2.  disheveled in appearance; unkempt.
Quotes:
I have seen scattered around the apartmentphotographs of a Gertrude Stein who wears her hair ina massive topknot, loose, blowzy , somewhat indisarray.
— Monique Truong, The Book of Salt , 2003
She restores her make-up there: she looks hot andblowzy . Her lipstick has bled into the soft skin roundher mouth. Hairpins have sprung out. Her nose andeyelids shine.
— A.S. Byatt, “Baglady,” Elements , 1998
Origin:
The origin of blowzy  is uncertain, though it was perhaps once a cant term. It entered English in the1700s.
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