Sunday Photo Fiction Challenge – Three Tales in a Bubble

Submitted for Sunday Photo Fiction

spf

The Assignment: The idea of Photo Fiction is write a story of around 100-200 words (which is also called Flash Fiction) based on a photo as a prompt. In this particular photo fiction, the story must be based on the photo below.  To read stories written by others, click on the links tool below.


On the September 14, 2014 Sunday Photo Fiction I wrote a trilogy.  Today I decided that I would try expanding those stories for a few weeks.  The titles will not be Train Track Trilogy each week but will have three or a version of three in the title.  To read the first part which is the introduction to the three stories, please enjoy Train Track Trilogy.  Today my stories continue with Three Tales in a Bubble.

Credit: Al Forbes

Credit: Al Forbes

 

Three Tales in a Bubble

Kim tried to calm her emotions. She told Mark she would get clean but she wanted to get high. She thought she had more time but when Mark told her he was leaving, Kim’s bubble burst and reality set in. She could slip back into her old ways or pick herself up and really get clean. Kim didn’t know if she had the strength but she was going to try.

Dara Morgan watched the passing landscape. She was about to burst the bubble buffering her parent’s reality about their only daughter. Her goals and those of her parents have always been generally in sync but now with the life growing inside of her, her immediate future has been taken out of her control.

Born in 1943, after her father went to war, Krista didn’t know her father and with her mother’s mental state, she didn’t know Mildred either. Krista’s grandmother, who passed away five years ago, raised Krista. Being her mother’s primary caregiver now was difficult. Every day Krista drove her mother to the train station to wait for a passenger who would never arrive. Her mother’s doctors warned about bursting Mildred’s reality bubble. Her father was a mystery, but she knew he would not be arriving by train today.

 

The World’s Outstanding Women (WOW): Florence Griffith Joyner (Flo-Jo)

WOMENS-symbolThroughout history women have made their mark in a wide variety of ways.  Each Saturday I plan to highlight one of these remarkable women.  There will be no limit to the areas of history that I may include; however as a guide I will look to the month of their birth, the month of their death or the month associated with their mark in history when I select them.  Is there an outstanding women in history you would like me to include?  I welcome your suggestions.  Would you like to guest blog one of the world’s outstanding women?  Let me hear from you.

Today an outstanding woman from the world of sports.  Meet Florence Delorez Griffith Joyner but he world just called her Flo-Jo.

 

Florence Delorez Griffith Joyner

Florence Delorez Griffith Joyner

Quotes by Flo Jo:

“People don’t pay much attention to you when you are second best. I wanted to see what it felt like to be number one.”

“When anyone tells me I can’t do anything… I’m just not listening any more.”

Nothing is going to be handed to you — you have to make things happen.”

“Parents need to be role models for children and instill in them the fact that exercise and healthy eating should be lifelong habits”

“Your dreams deserve a try… the sky’s the limit!”

Quotes about Flo Jo:

“We were dazzled by her speed, humbled by her talent, and captivated by her style.”
– Former President Bill Clinton

“For a long time, we’ve been thought of as ‘jocks.’ Florence brings in the glamour. She walks out on the track like she owns it.”
– Wilma Rudolph, 1960 Olympic gold medalist

Wilma Rudolph 1960 Olympian

Wilma Rudolph 1960 Olympian

“People are still trying to catch the records she set in ’88. It’s an amazing legacy. Many have tried and all have failed in terms of her records.”
– Carl Lewis, nine-time Olympic gold medalist

US Olympian, Carl Lewis

US Olympian, Carl Lewis

“She was a role model for girls and young women in sports. She will be remembered among America’s greatest Olympians, and she will be recalled with the legends, like Wilma Rudolph and Babe Didrikson Zaharias.”
– Bill Hybl, U.S. Olympic Committee president

“She showed so many young kids that sports was a real alternative to drugs and violence.”
– Arnold Schwarzenegger


Education and career

On December 21, 1959, Florence Griffith was born in Los Angeles, California, and she was raised in the Jordan Downs public housing complex.  During the late 1980s she became a popular figure in international track and field because of her record-setting performances and flashy personal style. She was the wife of the triple jumper Al Joyner and the sister-in-law of the heptathlete and long jumperJackie Joyner-Kersee.

Florence Griffith Joyner - Seth Poppel/Yearbook Library, Tony Duffy/Getty Images

Florence Griffith Joyner – Seth Poppel/Yearbook Library, Tony Duffy/Getty Images

Griffith ran track at Jordan High School in Los Angeles. As a senior in 1978, she finished sixth at the CIF California State Meet behind future teammates Alice Brown and Pam Marshall.

Jordan High School, Los Angeles, California

Jordan High School, Los Angeles, California

Griffith attended the California State University at Northridge, and she was on the track team coached by Joyner-Kersee’s future husband, Bob Kersee. This team also included her teammates Brown and Jeanette Bolden. However, Griffith had to drop out in order to support her family, and then she took a job as a bank teller. Kersee was then able to find financial aid for Griffith and she returned to college. Brown, Bolden, and Griffith qualified for the 100-meter final at the trials for the 1980 Summer Olympics (Brown winning, Griffith last in the final). Griffith also ran the 200 meters, narrowly finishing fourth, a foot out of a qualifying position. However, the U.S. Government had already decided to boycott those Olympic Games mooting those results. After the season Kersee became the head coach of the track team at the University of California at Los Angeles, which prompted Griffith to also transfer there, since she was academically eligible to do so. In 1982, Griffith graduated from UCLA with her bachelor’s degree in psychology.

Florence Griffith Joyner at UCLA

Florence Griffith Joyner at UCLA

Griffith finished fourth in the 200 meter sprint at the first World Championship in Athletics in 1983. The following year she gained much more attention, though mostly because of her extremely long and colorful fingernails, rather than the silver medal that she won in the 1984 Summer Olympics. In 1985, she won the 100-meter IAAF Grand Prix Final with the time of 11.00 seconds. After the 1984 Olympic Games, she spent less time running, and she married the Olympic triple jump champion of 1984, Al Joyner, in 1987.

Those are some nails.  It's a good thing track is her thing and not blogging :)

Those are some nails. It’s a good thing track is her thing and not blogging :)

Upon returning at the 1987 World Championships, Griffith Joyner finished second again in the 200 meter sprint.

In 1988, with no outstanding early season marks to indicate fitness, in the first race of the quarterfinals of the U.S. Olympic Trials, she stunned her colleagues when she sprinted 100 meters in 10.49 seconds, the world record. Several sources indicate that her race was most likely wind-assisted. Although at the time of the race the wind meter at the event measured a wind speed of 0.0 meters per second (no wind), some observers who were present noted evidence of significant winds, and wind speeds of up to 7.0 m/s were measured at other times during the track meet. The previous race on the track was measured at +5.2, and while the second quarterfinal was also 0.0, the third quarterfinal was +4.9.

Since 1997 the International Athletics Annual of the Association of Track and Field Statisticians has listed this performance as “probably strongly wind assisted, but recognized as a world record”. Besides this one race, Griffith Joyner’s fastest wind-legal time in this sprint was 10.61 seconds, which would also be the unbroken world record.

By now known to the world as “Flo-Jo”, Griffith Joyner was the big favorite for the titles in the sprint events at the 1988 Summer Olympics. In the 100-meter final, she ran a wind-assisted 10.54, beating her nearest rival Evelyn Ashford by 0.30 seconds. In the 200 meter semifinal, she set the world record of 21.56 seconds, and then she broke this record again in winning in the final by 0.38 seconds with her time of 21.34 seconds.

Florence Griffith Joyner celebrates after she takes the 100m gold at Seoul 1988. Photograph: BTS/Popperfoto

Florence Griffith Joyner celebrates after she takes the 100m gold at Seoul 1988. Photograph: BTS/Popperfoto

At the same Olympics Griffith Joyner also ran with the 4×100 m relay and the 4×400 m relay teams. Her team won first place in the 4×100 m relay and second place in the 4×400 m relay. Their time is still the second fastest in history, following the winner of this race. This was her first internationally rated 4×400 m relay.

1988 Seoul Olympics she won three gold medals in the 100, 200 and 4x100 meters.

1988 Seoul Olympics she won three gold medals in the 100, 200 and 4×100 meters.

Griffith Joyner was the winner of the James E. Sullivan Award of 1988 as the top amateur athlete (male or female) in the United States. She retired from competition shortly after that.

In 1996, Griffith Joyner appeared on the Charlie Rose show, and she announced her comeback to competitive athletics, only this time to concentrate on the 400-meter run. Her reason was that she had already set world marks in both the 100 m and 200 m events, with the 400 m world record being her goal. Griffith Joyner trained steadily leading up to the U.S. Olympic trials in June. However, tendonitis in her right leg ended her hopes of becoming a triple-world-record holder. Al Joyner was to also attempt a comeback, but he too was unable to compete due to an injured quadriceps muscle.

Among the things she did away from the track was to design the basketball uniforms for the Indiana Pacers NBA team in 1989.

Griffith Joyner appeared in the soap opera, Santa Barbara in 1992, as “Terry Holloway”, a photographer similar to Annie Leibovitz.

Allegations of drug use

Aside from whether her 1988 Olympic trial world record was wind-aided, Griffith Joyner was dogged by rumors of drug use.  In 1988, Joaquim Cruz, the Brazilian gold medalist in the 800-meter run at the 1984 Summer Olympics, claimed that Griffith Joyner’s times could only have been the result of using steroids or other performance-enhancing drugs, that her physique had changed dramatically in 1988 (showing marked gains in muscle mass and definition), and that her performance had improved dramatically over a short period of time. Before the 1988 track and field season, Griffith Joyner’s best time in the 100-meter sprint was 10.96 seconds. In 1988, she improved that by 0.47 seconds (or 0.35 sec for the non-wind-aided time). Similarly, her best before 1988 at 200-meters was 21.96 seconds. In 1988, she improved that by 0.62 seconds to 21.34 seconds, another time that has not been approached. Prior to the Olympic games in Seoul, she prematurely cut her European tour short (she had been booed off the track by the spectators). Griffith Joyner attributed the change in her physique to new health programs.   Al Joyner replaced Bob Kersee as her coach, and he changed her training program to include more lower body strength training exercises such as squats and lunges.

Before and After: Flo-Jo in 1986 (left) and 1988

Before and After: Flo-Jo in 1986 (left) and 1988

Griffith Joyner retired from competitive track and field after her Olympic triumph in 1988. She was repeatedly tested during competition, and she did not fail any of these drug tests. Mandatory random out-of-competition drug testing came into effect during the 1989 season.

After her death in 1998, Prince Alexandre de Merode, the Chairman of the International Olympic Committee’s medical commission, claimed that Joyner was singled out for extra, rigorous drug testing during the 1988 Olympic Games because of rumors of steroid use. De Merode told The New York Times that Manfred Donike, who was at that time considered to be the foremost expert on drugs and sports, failed to discover any banned substances during that testing. De Merode later said:

“We performed all possible and imaginable analyses on her…We never found anything. There should not be the slightest suspicion [on Florence Griffith Joyner].”

 Death

On September 21, 1998, Griffith Joyner died in her sleep at home in the Canyon Crest neighborhood of Mission Viejo, California, at the age of 38. The unexpected death was investigated by the sheriff-coroner’s office, which announced on October 22 that the cause of death was suffocation during a severe epileptic seizure. She was also found to have had a cavernous hemangioma, a congenital brain abnormality that made Joyner subject to seizures. According to a family attorney, she had suffered a tonic–clonic seizure in 1990, and had also been treated for seizures in 1993 and 1994.

The coroner had requested that Griffith Joyner’s body specifically be tested for steroids, but was informed that there was not enough urine in her bladder and that the test could not accurately be performed on other biological samples.

The city of Mission Viejo dedicated a park at the entrance to her neighborhood in her honor.

At the heart of Florence Joyner Olympiad Park in Mission Viejo stands a life-size bronze statue of Olympic track champion Florence Joyner crossing the finish line

At the heart of Florence Joyner Olympiad Park in Mission Viejo stands a life-size bronze statue of Olympic track champion Florence Joyner crossing the finish line

This Week in World War II – Operation Stalemate

world-war-2THIS WEEK IN WORLD WAR II

OPERATION STALEMATE

First wave of LVTs moves toward the invasion beaches - Peleliu

First wave of LVTs moves toward the invasion beaches – Peleliu

On September 15, 1944, the U.S. 1st Marine Division lands on the island of Peleliu, one of the Palau Islands in the Pacific, as part of a larger operation to provide support for Gen. Douglas MacArthur, who was preparing to invade the Philippines. The cost in American lives would prove historic.

peleliu-map1

The Palaus, part of the Caroline Islands, were among the mandated islands taken from Germany and given to Japan as one of the terms of the Treaty of Versailles at the close of World War I. The U.S. military lacked familiarity with the islands, and Adm. William Halsey argued against Operation Stalemate, which included the Army invasion of Morotai in the Dutch East Indies, believing that MacArthur would meet minimal resistance in the Philippines, therefore making this operation unnecessary, especially given the risks involved.  I wrote about Morotai in the post covering September 1944 – USS Hornet (CV-12) – September 1944

Peleliu was subject to pre-invasion bombardment, but it proved of little consequence. The Japanese defenders of the island were buried too deep in the jungle, and the target intelligence given the Americans was faulty. Upon landing, the Marines met little immediate resistance—but that was a ploy. Shortly thereafter, Japanese machine guns opened fire, knocking out more than two dozen landing craft. Japanese tanks and troops followed, as the startled 1st and 5th Marine regiments fought for their lives. Jungle caves disgorged even more Japanese soldiers. Within one week of the invasion, the Marines lost 4,000 men. By the time it was all over, that number would surpass 9,000. The Japanese lost more than 13,000 men. Flamethrowers and bombs finally subdued the island for the Americans—but it all proved pointless. MacArthur invaded the Philippines without need of Army or Marine protection from either Peleliu or Morotai.

What Happened on September 17th – Hanoi Releases Three POWs

On September 17, 1972, three U.S. pilots are released by Hanoi. They were the first POWs released since 1969. North Vietnamese officials cautioned the United States not to force the freed men to “slander” Hanoi, claiming that “distortions” about Hanoi’s treatment of POWs from a previous release of prisoners in 1969 caused Hanoi to temporarily suspend the release of POWs. The conditions for their release stipulated that they would not do anything to further the U.S. war effort in Indochina. The rest of the POWs were released in March 1973 as part of the agreement that led to the Paris Peace Accords.

This March 17, 1973 file photo shows released prisoner of war Lt. Col. Robert L. Stirm being greeted by his family at Travis Air Force Base

This March 17, 1973 file photo shows released prisoner of war Lt. Col. Robert L. Stirm being greeted by his family at Travis Air Force Base

Feb12-POWsFlyingHome(NARA)(320)

What Happened on September 16th – Rapper’s Delight

SugarHillGang

Released on September 16, 1979, “Rapper’s Delight” by American hip hop trio The Sugarhill Gang may not be the first single to feature rapping, it is generally considered to be the song that first popularized hip hop in the United States and around the world. The song is ranked #251 on the Rolling Stone magazine’s list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time and #2 on both About.com’s and VH1’s 100 Greatest Hip-Hop Songs. It is also included in NPR’s list of the 100 most important American musical works of the 20th century. The song was also named as the Greatest Really Long Rock Song of all time by Digital Dream Door (Long is right.  Check out the lyrics below). It was preserved into the National Recording Registry by the Library of Congress in 2011, calling it “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant.”

Of course who could ever forget Brian Williams of NBC News spliced rap created by Jimmy Fallon.

“Rapper’s Delight” by the Sugar Hill Gang

Source:  http://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/sugarhillgang/rappersdelight.html

I said a hip hop,
Hippie to the hippie,
The hip, hip a hop, and you don’t stop, a rock it
To the bang bang boogie, say, up jump the boogie,
To the rhythm of the boogie, the beat.
Now, what you hear is not a test – I’m rappin’ to the beat,
And me, the groove, and my friends are gonna try to move your feet.
See, I am Wonder Mike, and I’d like to say hello,
To the black, to the white, the red and the brown,
The purple and yellow. But first, I gotta
Bang bang, the boogie to the boogie,
Say up jump the boogie to the bang bang boogie,
Let’s rock, you don’t stop,
Rock the rhythm that’ll make your body rock.
Well so far you’ve heard my voice but I brought two friends along,
And the next on the mic is my man Hank,
C’mon, Hank, sing that song!
Check it out, I’m the C-A-S-A, the N-O-V-A,
And the rest is F-L-Y,
You see I go by the code of the doctor of the mix,
And these reasons I’ll tell you why.
You see, I’m six foot one, and I’m tons of fun
When I dress to a T,
You see, I got more clothes than Muhammad Ali
and I dress so viciously.
I got bodyguards, I got two big cars
That definitely ain’t the wack,
I got a Lincoln Continental and a sunfoofed Cadillac.
So after school I take a dip in the pool,
Which is really on the wall,
I got a colour TV, so I can see
The Knicks play basketball. Hear me talk about
Checkbooks, credit cards, mo’ money
Than a sucker could ever spend,
But I wouldn’t give a sucker or a bum form the Rucker
Not a dime ’til I made it again. Everybody go
Ho-tel, Mo-tel, Whatcha gonna do today? (Say what?)
‘Cos I’m a get a fly girl,
Gonna get some spank n’ drive off in a def OJ. Everybody go
Ho-tel, Mo-tel, Holiday Inn,
Say if your girl starts actin’ up, then you take her friend.
Master Gee! My mellow!
It’s on to you, so whatcha gonna do?
Well, it’s on’n’n’on’n’on on’n’on,
The beat don’t stop until the break of dawn.
I said M-A-S, T-E-R, a G with a double E,
I said I go by the unforgettable name
Of the man they call the Master Gee.
Well, my name is known all over the world
By all the foxy ladies and the pretty girls.
I’m goin’ down in history
As the baddest rapper there ever could be.
Now I’m feelin’ the highs and you’re feelin’ the lows,
The beat starts gettin’ into your toes
You start poppin’ your fingers and stompin’ your feet
And movin’ your body while while you’re sitting in your seat
And then damn! Ya start doin’ the freak, I said
Damn! Right outta your seat
Then you throw your hands high in the air,
Ya rockin’ to the rhythm, shake your derriere
Ya rockin’ to the beat without a care,
With the sureshot MCs for the affair.
Now, I’m not as tall as the rest of the gang
But I rap to the beat just the same.
I got a little face, and a pair of brown eyes
All I’m here to do, ladies, is hypnotize
Singin’ on’n’n’on’n’on on’n’on,
The beat don’t stop until the break of dawn
Singin’ on’n’n’on’n’on on’n’on,
Like a hot buttered pop da pop da pop dibbie dibbie
Pop da pop pop, don’t you dare stop
Come alive y’all, gimme whatcha got
I guess by now you can take a hunch
And find that I am the baby of the bunch
But that’s okay, I still keep in stride,
‘Cos all I’m here to do is just wiggle your behind
Singin’ on’n’n’on’n’on on’n’on,
The beat don’t stop until the break of dawn.
Singin’ on’n’n’on’n’on on’n’on,
Rock rock, y’all, throw it on the floor
I’m gonna freak you here, I’m gona freak you there,
I’m gonna move you outta this atmosphere.
‘Cos I’m one of a kind and I’ll shock your mind
I’ll put TNT in your behind. I said
One, two, three, four, come on, girls, get on the floor
A-come alive, y’all, a-gimme whatcha got
‘Cos I’m guaranteed to make you rock
I said one, two, three, four, tell me, Wonder Mike
What are you waiting for?I said a hip hop,
The hippie to the hippie
The hip hip a hop, and you don’t stop, a rock it
To the bang bang boogie, say up jump the boogie,
To the rhythm of the boogie, the beat.
A Skiddleebebop, we rock, scooby doo,
And guess what, America, we love you
‘Cos you rocked and a rolled with so much soul,
You could rock ’til a hundred and one years old.
I don’t mean to brag, I don’t mean to boast,
But we like hot butter on our breakfast toast
Rock it up, Baby Bubba!
Baby Bubba to the boogie da bang bang da boogie
To the beat, beat, it’s unique
Come on everybody and dance to the beat![Drum break]A hip hop
The hippie to the hippie the
Hip hip a hop and you don’t stop, rock it
Rock it out, Baby Bubba to the boogie da bang bang
The boogie to the boogie, the beat.
I said, I can’t wait ’til the end of the week
When I’m rappin’ to the rhythm of a groovy beat
And I attempt to raise your body heat.
Just blow your mind, so you can’t speak
And do a thing but a-rock and shuffle your feet
And let it change up to a dance called the freak
And when you finally do come into your rhythmic beat,
Reast a little while so you don’t get weak.
I know a man named Hank
He has more rhymes than a serious bank
So come on Hank, sing that song,
To the rhythm of the boogie, the bang bang da bong!Well, I’m Imp the Dimp, the ladies’ pimp,
The women fight for my delight.
But I’m the grandmaster with the three MCs
That shock the house for the young ladies
And when you come inside, into the front,
You do the freak, spank, and do the bump
And when the sucker MC try to prove a point,
We’re a treacherous trio, we’re the serious joint!
a-From sun to sun and from time to time
I sit down and write a brand new rhyme
Because they say that miracles never cease
I’ve created a devastating masterpiece
I’m gonna rock the mic ’til you can’t resist,
Everybody, I say it goes like this
Well, I was walking home late one afternoon
A reporter stopped me for an interview
She said she’s heard stories and she’s heard fables
That I’m vicious on the mic and the turntable
This young reporter I did adore,
So I rocked some vicious rhymes like I never did before
She said, “Damn, fly guy, I’m in love with you
The Casanova legend must have been true”
I said, “By the way, baby, what’s your name?”
Said, “I go by name of Lois Lane
And you could be my boyfriend, you surely can,
Just let me quit my boyfriend called Superman.”
I said, “He’s a fairy, I do suppose
Flyin’ through the air in pantyhose
He may be very sexy, or even cute,
But he looks like a sucker in a blue and red suit,”
I said, “You need a man man who’s got finesse
And his whole name across his chest
He may be able to fly all through the night,
But can he rock a party ’til the early light?
He can’t satisfy you with his little worm,
But I can bust you out with my super sperm!”
I go do it, I go do it, I go do it, do it, do it.
An’ I’m here an’ I’m there, I’m Big Ban Hank, I’m everywhere
Just throw your hands up in the air
And party hardy like you just don’t care
Let’s do it, don’t stop, y’all, a tick tock, y’all, you don’t stop!
Go ho-tel, mo-tel, whatcha gonna do today? (Say what?)
I’m gonna get a fly girl, gonna get some spank, drive off in a def OJ,
Everybody go, “Ho-tel, mo-tel, Holiday Inn”
You say if your girl starts actin’ up, then you take her friend
I say skip, dive, what can I say?
I can’t fit ‘em all inside my OJ,
So I just tak half, and bust ‘em out,
I give the rest to Master Gee so he can shock the house
It was twelve o’clock one Friday night
I was rockin’ to the beat and feelin’ all right
Everybody was dancin’ on the floor
Doin’ all the things they never did before
And then this fly girl with a sexy lean
She came into the bar, she came into the scene
She travelled deeper inside the room
All the fellas checked out her white Sassoons
She came up to the table, looked into my eyes
Then she turned around and shook her behind
So I said to myself, it’s time for me to release
My vicious rhyme I call my masterpiece
And now people in the house, this is just for you
A little rap to make you boogaloo
Now the group you hear is called Phase Two
And let me tell you somethin’, we’re a helluva crew
Once a week, we’re on the street
Just to cut in the jams and look at your feet
For you to party, you gotta have the moves,
So we’ll get right down and get you a groove
For you to dance, you got to be hot
So we’ll get right down and make you rock
Now the system’s on and the girls are there
You definitely have a rockin’ affair
But let me tell you somethin’, there’s still one fact
And to have a party, you got to have a rap
So when the party’s over, you’re makin’ it home,
And tryin’ to sleep before the break of dawn
And while you’re sleepin’, you start to dream,
And thinkin’ how you danced on the disco scene
My name appears in your mind,
Yeah, a name you know that was right on time
It was Phase Two just doin’ a do
Rockin’ you down ‘cos you knew we could
To the rhythm of the beat that makes you freak,
Come alive girls, get on your feet
To the rhythm of the beat to the beat the beat
To the double beat beat that makes you freak
To the rhythm of the beat that says you go on
On’n’on into the break of dawn
Now I got a man comin’ on right now
He’s garuanteed to throw down
He goes by the name of Wonder Mike
Come on, Wonder Mike, do what you like!

I say a can of beer that’s sweeter than honey,
Like a millionaire that has no money
Like a rainy day that is not wet,
Like a gamblin’ fiend that does not bet
Like Dracula without his fangs,
Like the boogie to the boogie without the boogie bang
Like collard greens that don’t taste good,
Like a tree that’s not made out of wood
Like goin’ up and not comin’ down,
Is just like the beat without the sound, no sound
To the beat beat, you do the freak
Everybody just rock and dance to the beat
Have you ever went over a friends house to eat
And the food just ain’t no good?
The macaroni’s soggy, the peas are mushed,
And the chicken tastes like wood
So you try to play it off like you think you can
By saying that you’re full
And then your friend says, “Mama, he’s just being polite
He ain’t finished, uh-uh, that’s bull!”
So your heart starts pumpin’ and you think of a lie
And you say that you already ate
And your friend says “Man, there’s plenty of food”
So you pile some more on your plate
While the stinky food’s steamin’, your mind starts to dreamin’
Of the moment that it’s time to leave
And then you look at your plate and your chicken’s slowly rottin’
Into something that looks like cheese
Oh so you say “That’s it, I gotta leave this place
I don’t care what these people think,
I’m just sittin’ here makin’ myself nauseous
With this ugly food that stinks”
So you bust out the door while it’s still closed
Still sick from the food you ate
And then you run to the store for quick relief
From a bottle of Kaopectate
And then you call your friend two weeks later
To see how he has been
And he says, “I understand about the food,
Baby Bubba, but we’re still friends”
With a hip hop the hippie to the hippie
The hip hip a hop, a you don’t stop the rockin’
To the bang bang boogie
Say up jump the boogie to the rhythm of the boogie the beat
I say, “Hank, can ya rock?
Can ya rock to the rhythm that just don’t stop?
Can ya hip me to the shoobie doo?”
I said, “Come on, make, make the people move!”

I go to the balls and then ring the bell
Because I am the man with the clientele
And if ya ask me why I rock so well,
A Big Bang, I got clientele
And from the time I was only six years old
I never forgot what I was told
It was the best advice I ever had
It came from my wise, dear old dad
He said, “Sit down, punk, I wanna talk to you
And don’t say a word until I’m through
Now there’s a time to laugh, a time to cry
A time to live and a time to die
A time to break and a time to chill
To act civilized or act real ill
But whatever you do in your lifetime
You never let an MC steal your rhyme”
So from six to six ’til this very day
I’ll always remember what he had to say
So when the sucker MCs try to chump my style
I let them know that I’m versatile
I got style, finesse, and a little black book
That’s filled with rhymes and I know you wanna look
But the thing that seperates you from me
And that is called originality
Because my rhymes are on from what you heard
I didn’t even bite, not a go—word
And I say a little more, later on tonight
So the sucker MCs can bite all night
A tick a tock, y’all, a beat beat, y’all
A let’s rock, y’all, you don’t stop
Ya go, “Ho-tel, mo-tel, whatcha gonna do today?” (Say what?)
Ya say, “I’m gonna get a fly girl, gonna get some spank and

Drive off in a def OJ”
Everybody go, “Ho-tel, mo-tel, Holiday Inn”
Ya say if your girl starts actin’ up, then you take her friends
A like that, y’all, to the beat, y’all
Beat beat y’all, ya don’t stop!
A Master Gee, my mellow
It’s on to you so whatcha gonna do?

Well, like Johnny Carson on the Late Show
A like Frankie Crocker in stereo
Well like the Barkay’s singin’ “Holy Ghost”
The sounds to throw down, they’re played the most
It’s like my man Captain Sky
Whose name he earned with his super sperm
We rock and we don’t stop
Get off, y’all, I’m here to give you whatcha got
To the beat that it makes you freak
And come alive, girl, get on your feet
A like a Perry Mason without a case
Like Farrah Fawcett without her face
Like the Barkays on the mic
Like gettin’ down right for you tonight
Like movin’ your body so you don’t know how
Right to the rhythm and throw down
Like comin’ alive to the Master Gee
The brother who rocks so viciously
I said the age of one, my life begun
At the age of two I was doin’ the do
At the age of three, it was you and me
Rockin’ to the sounds of the Master Gee
At the age of four, I was on the floor
Givin’ all the freaks what they bargained for
At the age of five I didn’t take no jive
With the Master Gee it’s all the way live
At the age of six I was a-pickin’ up sticks
Rappin’ to the beat, my stick was fixed
At the age of seven, I was rockin’ in heaven
Don’tcha know I went off
I gotta run on down to the beat you see
Gettin’ right on down, makin’ all the girls
Just take off their clothes to the beat the beat
To the double beat beat that makes you freak
At the age of eight, I was really great
‘Cause every night, you see, I had a date
At the age of nine, I was right on time
‘Cause every night I had a party rhyme
Going on’n’n’on’n’ on on’n’on
The beat don’t stop until the break of dawn
A sayin’ on’n’n’on’n’ on on’n’on
Like a hot buttered de pop pop de popcorn…

 

What Happened on September 15th – The Nuremberg Race Laws

On September 15, 1935, German Jews are stripped of their citizenship, reducing them to mere “subjects” of the state.

The Nuremberg Laws of 1935 were laws passed in Nazi Germany. They used a pseudoscientific basis for racial discrimination against Jewish people. This chart states that Jews en Germans are not allowed to marry. Zulassig means Allowed and Verboten means Forbidden

The Nuremberg Laws of 1935 were laws passed in Nazi Germany. They used a pseudoscientific basis for racial discrimination against Jewish people. This chart states that Jews en Germans are not allowed to marry. Zulassig means Allowed and Verboten means Forbidden

After Hitler’s accession to the offices of president and chancellor of Germany, he set about the task of remaking his adopted country (Hitler had to pull some strings even to be eligible for office, as he was Austrian by birth) into the dream state he imagined. But his dream was soon to become a nightmare for many. Early on in his reign, the lives of non-Jewish German citizens were barely disrupted.

Eva Justin of the Racial Hygiene and Demographic Biology Research Unit measuring the skull of a Romani woman

Eva Justin of the Racial Hygiene and Demographic Biology Research Unit measuring the skull of a Romani woman

But not so for Hitler’s “enemies.” Hitler’s racist ideology, which elevated those of “pure-blooded” German stock to the level of “masters” of the earth, began working itself out in vicious ways.

Roma and Sinti suffered greatly as victims of Nazi persecution. Eye color determination, 1936

Roma and Sinti suffered greatly as victims of Nazi persecution. Eye color determination, 1936

Within the first year of Hitler’s rule, German Jews were excluded from a host of high-profile vocations, from public office to journalism, radio, theater, film, and teaching-even farming. The professions of law and medicine were also withdrawn slowly as opportunities. “Jews Not Welcome” signs could be seen on shop and hotel windows, beer gardens, and other public arenas. With the Nuremberg Laws, these discriminatory acts became embedded in the culture by fiat, making them even more far-reaching. Jews were forbidden to marry “Aryans” or engage in extramarital relations with them. Jews could not employ female Aryan servants if they were less than 35 years of age. Jews found it difficult even to buy food, as groceries, bakeries, and dairies would not admit Jewish customers. Even pharmacies refused to sell them medicines or drugs.

Antisemitic and anti-capitalist Nazi cartoon telling Germans not to buy from shops owned by Jews

Antisemitic and anti-capitalist Nazi cartoon telling Germans not to buy from shops owned by Jews

What was the outside world’s reaction? Because unemployment had dropped precipitously under Hitler’s early commandeering of the economy, and the average German felt renewed hope and pride, the face of Germany seemed brighter, more at peace with itself. While some foreign visitors, even some political opponents within Germany itself, decried these racist laws and practices, most were beguiled into thinking it was merely a phase, and that Hitler, in the words of former British Prime Minister Lloyd George, was “a great man.”

Sunday Photo Fiction Challenge – Train Track Trilogy

Submitted for Sunday Photo Fiction

spf

The Assignment: The idea of Photo Fiction is write a story of around 100-200 words (which is also called Flash Fiction) based on a photo as a prompt. In this particular photo fiction, the story must be based on the photo below.  To read stories written by others, click on the links tool below.

Credit: Al Forbes

Credit: Al Forbes

Train Track Trilogy

Kim and Mark stood on the platform. The arriving train will take Mark out of her life. Kim tried to get him to stay, promising that she will get help, get clean. He had given her chances before and each time, she didn’t follow through. He had no more chances left to give her.

A few feet away, Mr. and Mrs. Morgan stood looking up and down the tracks. When their daughter called last week asking to come home, they had tried to get her to stay at college but she seemed very upset. They’ll be glad to see her but are also anxious to know what went wrong.

The train arrived and Mark boarded quickly. Nearby, the Morgans embraced their daughter then moved towards the parking lot. With tears streaming down her face, Kim left the platform too.

Soon the platform was empty except for an old woman. She didn’t hold a ticket, wasn’t seeing someone off and wasn’t consulting a timetable for an arrival. In fact, Mildred had become a daily fixture at the station. In 1945, the telegram said he’d be arriving on the 9:00 am train. It didn’t say which date and she didn’t want to miss him.

What Happened on September 14th – The First American Saint

On September 14, 1975, Elizabeth Ann Seton is canonized by Pope Paul VI at the Vatican in Rome, becoming the first American-born Catholic saint.  154 years after her death.

seasets

Born in New York City in 1774, Elizabeth Bayley was the daughter of an Episcopalian physician. She devoted much of her time to charity work with the poor and in 1797 founded the Society for the Relief of Poor Widows with Small Children in New York. She married William Seton, and in 1803 she traveled with him to Italy, where she was exposed to the Roman Catholic Church. After she herself was widowed and left with five children in 1803, she converted to Catholicism and in 1808 went to Baltimore to establish a Catholic school for girls.

Mother Seton House Mother Seton HouseThis three-story, Federal-style house is where Mrs. Elizabeth Seton and her three daughters came in 1808, from New York City, to establish a boarding school for girls.

Mother Seton House
Mother Seton HouseThis three-story, Federal-style house is where Mrs. Elizabeth Seton and her three daughters came in 1808, from New York City, to establish a boarding school for girls.

In 1809, she founded the United States’ first religious order, the Sisters of Charity of St. Joseph. A few months later, Mother Seton and the sisters of the order moved to a poor parish where they provided free education to poor children. Mother Seton’s order grew rapidly, and she continued to teach until her death in 1821.

A HEART FOR CHARITY: Elizabeth started St. Joseph's Academy for Catholic girls, and also established a religious community—the Sisters of Charity

A HEART FOR CHARITY: Elizabeth started St. Joseph’s Academy for Catholic girls, and also established a religious community—the Sisters of Charity

In 1856, Seton Hall University was named for her.

campuswp

She was canonized in 1975.

seton1

The World’s Outstanding Women (WOW): Alice Stebbins Wells

WOMENS-symbolThroughout history women have made their mark in a wide variety of ways.  Each Saturday I plan to highlight one of these remarkable women.  There will be no limit to the areas of history that I may include; however as a guide I will look to the month of their birth, the month of their death or the month associated with their mark in history when I select them.  Is there an outstanding women in history you would like me to include?  I welcome your suggestions.  Would you like to guest blog one of the world’s outstanding women?  Let me hear from you.

Today an outstanding woman from the Los Angeles Rank and File.  Meet Alice Stebbins Wells.

Police Officer, Alice Stebbins Wells

Police Officer, Alice Stebbins Wells

 

Transcribed by V. Gerald Iaquinta.

Source: California of the South Vol. V, by John Steven McGroarty, Pages 380-384, Clarke Publ., Chicago, Los Angeles, Indianapolis. 1933.

Photographs: Google Images or Ancestry.com

The life history of Alice Stebbins Wells is an interesting one. She has been the leader in many movements of importance to the human race and a pioneer in some, notably in the policewoman movement. The position she has occupied for the past twenty-four years, that of policewoman in Los Angeles, requires talents which she possesses to a high degree. She has a strict sense of justice, a keen intellect, is guided by high ethical standards, and above all else has a desire to be of real service to mankind. She seems to have an intuitive knowledge of human beings, and has a genuine interest in them irrespective of station, race or creed. In reviewing her life work she seems to have a real desire to help as many as possible and to bring them to a realization of their latent possibilities. She firmly believes there is a little spark of virtue in every human being only waiting to be strengthened. No situation can daunt her courageous soul.

Alice Bessie Stebbins was born on June 13, 1873 in Manhattan, Kansas.  A daughter of Homer Pease and Sarah (Kinney) Stebbins, both of whom were descendants of notable New England families and early graduates of Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio, where Mrs. Sarah Stebbins’ father, Dean Daniel Kinney, was known for fifty years to all Oberlin students. Homer P. Stebbins taught Latin in the Oberlin schools, and later established and edited the first newspaper in Hiawatha, Kansas, a file of which is in the state capitol at Topeka.

Alice Stebbins was educated at Atchison, Kansas, graduating from the high school there. After leaving school she devoted several years to a business career in the Middle West, New York, and New England. About 1900 she became pastor’s assistant for Dr. Newell Dwight Hillis in Plymouth Church, Brooklyn, made famous by Henry Ward Beecher, and following that she spent two years at the Hartford, Connecticut, Theological Seminary, specializing in Old Testament history with the intention of giving lectures on “The Message of the Prophets for Today.” While attending the seminary she spent two vacations filling summer pulpits in Congregational Home Missionary churches in Maine, thereby becoming the first woman preacher in that state. She then gave her lecture course on the prophets with their civic message for our day at Chautauqua, Bible schools, and many churches throughout the East and Middle West, including Oklahoma.

Alice Stebbins Wells

Alice Stebbins Wells

She accepted a pastorate for a short time near Perry, Oklahoma. While in that state she married Frank Wells, a member of a pioneer Wisconsin family, whose eventual ill health necessitated her return to the professional field. Mr. and Mrs. Wells have three children: Ramona, who married Carl Horack, of Berkeley, California; Raymond Stebbins, who married Vera VanValer; and Gardner Stebbins, who married Carmen Modie. Both sons live in Los Angeles.

In May, 1910, having moved to Los Angeles, Mrs. Wells conceived the idea and undertook the work of securing the enactment of legislation creating the office of policewoman in this city. This undertaking was successfully concluded on August 13 (one day later than other sources) of that year, and on this date she took the office, thus becoming the first regular policewoman in the United States and, so far as is known, the world.

This was such an innovation and a widening of the field for women, as well as helpful in character building for women and children, that interest was immediately aroused and in response to many appeals she lectured in scores of cities in the United States and Canada. Foreign countries were also deeply impressed with the movement and inquiries flooded her office. As the result of this agitation Mrs. Wells was able, in May, 1915, to call a conference for the purpose of organizing an international association of policewomen in Baltimore, Maryland, coincident with the National Conference of Charities and Corrections, now known as the National Conference of Social Work. She was elected president and served for five years. The movement had grown so rapidly that she was enabled to invite policewomen from fourteen states to this organizing convention. At the conference less than one year later the association membership represented twenty-two states, Canada and England. Their publications are interesting even to the layman, especially Mrs. Wells’ first presidential address which was published in the annual conference proceedings, and Publication No. 1, which was printed and distributed the following year by the new policewomen’s association.

1915 - Alice Stebbins Wells Founder and 1st President

1915 – Alice Stebbins Wells Founder and 1st President

 

In this she fixed the status of the word policewoman originally chosen by her as a distinct term pertaining only to regularly appointed city officers. Because of the novelty every woman given police power for any reason whatever was being called a policewoman; an erroneous appellation often caused confusion and at times unjust criticism. She also urged training facilities in established centers because small cities were writing: “If we get the appropriation for a policewoman, can you recommend a trained woman officer who will come to us?” Mrs. Wells, in 1917, conducted the first university training class for policewomen at the first summer session held by the University of California in Los Angeles.

LAPD Policewoman's uniform (LAPD Museum)

LAPD Policewoman’s uniform (LAPD Museum)

Mrs. Wells is a Republican and a Prohibitionist. She is the founder and the extension director of the Pan-Pacific Association for Mutual Understanding. She organized this association in 1924 and it has held interesting travel dinners featuring Pacific Coast counties ever since. She is a member of the Friday Morning Club, which club was among the signers of her petition to create the office of policewoman. During 1927 – 1928 she was organizing chairman and first president of the Women’s Peace Officers Association of California, which during its first year enrolled membership extending from San Diego to Humboldt County, and published as a yearbook the first compilation of women peace officers of the state. (Policewomen, police matrons, deputy sheriffs and deputy constables.) Within the last twenty years more than two hundred fifty cities in the United States appointed policewomen, and the number in Los Angeles increased to thirty-two. Mrs. Wells has held her position continuously since her appointment in 1910. Her latest activity is that of curator of the Los Angeles Police Department, appointed by James E. Davis at her request in order that she might establish a museum within the police department. Here are being gathered photographs, clippings from newspapers, pamphlets, equipment, etc., dating from the earliest days of the department down to the present time.

Since the policewoman movement is a notable contribution from southern California to world welfare, the reception of this first policewoman and her message by the public is revealed by excerpts from a few of the newspapers of those times of which we give a few of interest. Ottawa Citizen (Ottawa, Canada), January 17, 1913: “Mrs. Wells is no academic speaker and speaks from a fund of knowledge acquired through actual experience and she is so earnest and of such a sweet and attractive personality as she presents her message concerning several grave problems and why there should be policewomen that sooner or later the civilized world must answer.”

Chicago Daily Tribune, January 22, 1913: “Resolutions were adopted by the Woman’s City Club yesterday calling for the appointment of policewomen in Chicago. Mrs. Alice Stebbins Wells has just told the meeting of her work as policewoman in the police department of Los Angeles. Mrs. Wells urged the Chicago department to appoint women for patrol duty, for censors of public amusements and advisers of women.”

Lexington (Ky.) Herald: “Womanly and winning, the first policewoman, Mrs. Wells, of Los Angeles, in her appearance in Lexington’s afternoon at the courthouse under the auspices of the Civic League, the Moral Improvement League, the Advisory Board of the Juvenile Court and the Associate Charities, more than justified the commendatory things that have been said and written of her work.”

Church Life, Toronto, Canada: “I fancy Mrs. Alice Stebbins Wells on her recent visit, has dispelled a good many illusions which some of us probably cherished. She is not large or vigorous but a gentle little figure endowed with a sweet smile, a sweet voice, not loud or strong, but clear and penetrating and altogether an appealing personality. I think the whole conception of the police department and its administration must be regarded with a new insight and appreciation by everyone who has heard this most gifted woman describe some of its general functions and uses.”

Herald, Washington, D. C.: “Mrs. Alice Stebbins Wells gave an address last night on ‘The Need of Policewomen and Their Work’ in the Unitarian Church. Dr. U. G. B. Pierie, pastor and Chaplain of the Senate, introduced Commissioner Rudolph as chairman of the evening. The necessity of women police officers was explained. It behooves every municipality to provide women officials who can render help in many ways when man would be powerless. The policewoman’s work is largely preventive. Mrs. Wells is small, and we who heard her talk in a low sweet voice would be apt to hazard a guess that she was a college professor or a litterateur.”

Among the written testimonials are these:

University of Pittsburgh, January 13, 1913: “I wish to express my appreciation of the address you delivered last night. It was most able, forceful, effective and convincing. The audience was delighted and instructed. The subjects you presented are fundamental to social well-being and you presented them in such a way as at once to disarm criticism and compel attention. The address cannot fail to bring about good results in Pittsburgh.

Very sincerely,

B. McCormack, Chancellor.”

Toronto, January 14, 1913. “Not in many years of social work and interest in social problems have I heard an address so comprehensive, so intelligent and so full of 1913 common sense as that to which we listened last evening.  There is in this day no lack of speakers who critize, but there is a dearth of speakers who are able to suggest as you did the preventive and educational measures which are practical. I am sure that your visit will prove of much benefit to our city.

Faithfully yours,

A. McCarthy, Controller.”

 

 

 

Friday Historical Fiction Giving the Facts – Officer Wells

historical-fiction Each Friday as an alternative way of posting about a historical event that occurred on this day in history, I will weave the event into a fictional story while still providing all the necessary facts.

 

 

 

“Good morning.  May I help you?” asked Miss Johnson.

“I need to see the Mayor.  My name is Alice Stebbins Wells, ” said Alice.

“Just a moment.”  Miss Johnson knock on the door and went into the Mayor’s office.

“Sir that Miss Wells is out front who wants to see you.”

“Show her in.  I have some time at the moment.”

Miss Johnson showed Alice into the Mayor’s office and began to leave.

“Miss Johnson please stay.  I may need you to take notes.”

The Mayor knew who Miss Wells was and he was kind of expecting her visit.

“Have a seat Miss Wells.  How may I help you this morning.”

“Mayor, I think you know why I have come.  I’ve been to see the police commissioner and I now want to plead my case with you.”

“Go on.”

“Every day women and children in our city are victims of crime.  I feel that a woman on the police force can be of real help.”

“Police work is dangerous.  I don’t think a woman can handle it.”

“I think you are wrong.  Nineteen years ago in Chicago, Canadian born, Marie Owens was the first female police in the United States.  If she could do it in Chicago in 1891, I can do it now in 1910.

“It isn’t entirely up to me.  You’ll need the police commissioner and the city council.”

“I am coming before the Los Angeles City Council at the next meeting.”

________

Police Officer, Alice Stebbins Wells

Police Officer, Alice Stebbins Wells

Alice Stebbins Wells did petition of commissioner and the Los Angeles City Council and on September 12, 1910, she became the first native born woman police officer in the United States.  She went on to become the founder and first president of the International Policewoman’s Association.  She traveled throughout America and Canada promoting female officers.  See my posting for today’s The World’s Outstanding Women for her full story.